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TECHNICAL NOTE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 27-31

Platelet-rich fibrin in the Alveolar Bone graft in cleft lip and palate patient


1 Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Craniofacial Anomalies Treatment Center, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro; Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil
2 Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Craniofacial Anomalies Treatment Center, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro; Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, Brazil
3 Division of Plastic Surgery and Chairman, Craniofacial Anomalies Treatment Center, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Bruno Santos de Barros Dias
Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Craniofacial Anomalies Treatment Center, Rio de Janeiro State University, Av. Marechal Rondon, 381, Sao Francisco Xavier, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/GFSC.GFSC_4_18

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Reconstruction of the alveolar ridge in patients with cleft lip and palate can be a challenging procedure. This stage of the treatment allows stabilization of the dental arch, adequate dental eruption, and orthodontic movement in the area of the cleft. Hence, it should be performed before the eruption of the permanent canine. Failure mainly occurs by dehiscence, exposure, and contamination of the bone graft. Adequate dissection, the definition of anatomical planes, and precise suture are paramount for a good result. However, this is often not enough. Sometimes, there is an anatomical limitation to make a suitable soft-tissue scaffold to be filled with bone graft. The lack of a hermetic closure of the anatomical planes can lead to contamination of the graft or even prevent its accomplishment in the same surgical time. Growth factors have been widely used in dentistry, with striking results in bone and tissue regeneration. Among these, platelet-rich fibrin is distinguished by allowing it to be made an autogenous membrane. This membrane supports exposure to the oral cavity without contamination and can stimulate the healing of soft and bony tissue, acting as a physical barrier. Its use as a growth factor and protective barrier of the alveolar bone graft in patients with cleft lip and palate is a promising tool for obtaining better results.


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